Linux Support

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Linux is a 32 bit (or 64 bit) multitasking, multi-user operating system.


It runs on standard PC hardware, if you can run windows, Linux will fly! It supports many different types of hardware, cards, etc. Linux supports multiprocessor hardware on 'many' CPU's and on up to 64Gb of RAM. It can operates as a stand-alone server or alongside other Linux or Windows NT servers. It is a Unix variant and a true child of the Internet . UNIX has been in existence since the 70's, long before Microsoft existed, and has stood the test of time.


The core of the Internet is based on UNIX computers.


Linux is flexible, fast and free! It has been written to function without a GUI (Graphical User Interface) and hence is faster by concept. For ease of use a choice of GUI's are available - but only need to be run when required.


The ability to run without Licenses allows customers to try software at no cost and for new software to be easily installed without checking on User counts - etc.


Linux is an Open Source System - the source code is available, allowing any good C programmer to tailor the system for your needs, or provide you in-depth support, something that cannot be done with other major operating systems.


Local support for linux is good. There are a variety of local sources for Linux software - check out ftp.linux.co.za as one such source (This service runs off the Posix Network). Linux does have a good presence and many large companies now use linux in preference to some of the more traditionally marketed solutions.


There are many major applications available for Linux, with more becoming available all the time. However, when Linux is run as a server, your existing applications will not be affected, they will still run an your current PC's, exactly as with any other server.


Linux is best compared with the reasons people buy a Windows NT machine - rather than perhaps a Windows 95/98/2K Desktop machine... though the supplied games on Linux far exceed those on desktop windows.


Support On Linux:

One is not tied to any particular company for support for Linux, Several companies around the world provide commercially supported versions. They all make use of a standard Linux kernel - but provide different facilities as well. One of these companies - Red Hat, which has investment from Intel and Netscape, is now a public corporation. Our own servers use Red Hat Linux. Many small companies like ourselves can provide all the installation and regular support you could ever need.


Acknowledgements:

The idea and initial content of these pages were taken from Oakhaven Consultants Ltd with the permission of Trevor Hennion, which I came across whilst looking for clues on how to install an ISDN card.